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In the Tunnel is the eighteenth chapter on the DVDs of Ghostbusters II. In this chapter. Egon, Ray, and Winston go investigating the subway tunnels of New York.

Cast

Equipment

Environmental

Locations

Plot

Egon Spengler, Ray Stantz, and Winston Zeddemore walked down some abandoned train tracks. Ray tripped on the track and yelped. Egon swept around with the Giga meter. Winston told Ray to watch his step. He was uneasy. Ray cited the entrance to the pneumatic railroad was near according to the old transit map he had. Egon was not getting any readings. Winston conceded at least it was too dark to see the cockroaches. Ray informed him it was the subway rats he had to be worried about because they were as big as beavers. Egon stated the rats got to be as big as four to five kilos. Winston was getting annoyed. Ray claimed to hear them behind the walls scratching and guessed there were thousands of them. Winston told him to shut up about the rats. Ray shouted "Hello" and heard the echo. Egon tried next with "Hey" and heard the echo. Winston started to relax and shouted "Hello!" There was no echo. A disembodied voice replied, "Wiiiiiinstooooon..." Winston stated he was leaving. Suddenly, they were surrounded by many severed heads impaled on stakes. Ray, Egon, and Winston screamed. Just as quickly, the heads vanished. Winston was confused about what just happened. Egon suggested they get their Proton Packs before they went any further. Winston agreed. A rumbling sound made them pause. Winston determined it sounded like a train. The rumbling continued. Ray disagreed because the lines were abandoned for 50 years. The rumbling came closer. Egon surmised it was coming from one of the tunnels above them. It sounded a lot closer to Winston. A light appeared and a train whistle sounded off. A train came down the tunnel towards them. Ray and Egon jumped out of the way. Winston froze and just stood there. The ghost train was intangible and passed right through him. Winston's hardhat fell to the ground as he wailed. After the train left, Egon got back up and speculated that was the old New York Central City Albany that derailed in 1920 and hundreds died. He asked Winston if he caught the number on the locomotive. Winston stated he missed it. Egon was positive something was trying to stop them from finding the river. Winston picked up his helmet and put it back on. He realized Ray was missing. They shouted out to him. Ray suddenly popped out and spooked them. They turned around and gathered themselves. Ray apologized then revealed he found a hole leading to the river. Egon followed Ray. Winston tried to remind them about getting the Proton Packs.

Egon, Ray, and Winston cleared some debris aside and walked into the Van Horne Pneumatic Station, the exact place where Ray was lowered down into. They stared at the River of Slime. Egon was amazed. Ray pointed out he was not lying about what he saw. Egon was astounded by the amount of negative energy required to generate such a flow. Winston quipped, "New York, what a town." Egon wanted to get a sounding and determine how deep it was. Winston used his sounding line and measured 6 feet then suddenly 12 feet. He realizing something was pulling the line. Ray yelled to on. Winston asked for a hand. Egon went over behind Winston. Ray shouted to get his belt off. Winston lost his hold and pulled into the river. The current carried him away, screaming. Ray and Egon looked at each other then jumped in after him screaming.

Dana Barrett and Peter Venkman dined at Armand's. Dana proposed a toast to the most charming, kindest, and most unusual man she ever broke up with. They clinked glasses and drank. Peter inquired why she dumped him. She denied it and clarified she was protecting herself because he was not very good for her. She asked him if he knew that. Peter retorted he was not even good for him. Dana told him he was much better than he realized and did not give himself enough credit. He mused he needed to hear that kind of stuff and if he had that kind of support on a 24-hour-day basis, he would have himself whipped into shape by the end of this century. Dana teased he should give her a jingle in the year 2000. Peter countered with giving her a jingle right now. Dana and Peter kissed.

Louis held Oscar and finished telling him his version of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, from the point of view of an accountant. He told Oscar the dwarfs had a limited partnership in a small mining operation, and one day a beautiful princess came to live with them, and they bartered housekeeping services for room and board. Louis thought that was a real good deal for them because they would not have to withhold Social Security or income taxes. He clarified that was against the rules but for the purposes of the story, it was okay. Janine made small talk and thought the apartment was a great place but it needed a woman's touch. Louis returned to the living room and gently closed the bedroom door. He reminded her Oscar was sleeping. Janine noticed he was very good with children. Louis thanked her for the compliment and revealed he practiced on his hamster. Janine asked if he lived alone. Janine held a crystal ball between her legs. Louis looked away. Louis revealed he used to have a roommate, but his mom moved to Florida. She invited him to sit next to her. Louis sat on the couch and suggested playing a round of Boggle or Super Mario Bros. but Janine called motherhood a very natural instinct and she would like to have a child herself. She crossed a leg over Louis's then asked him if he did. Louis became nervous. She touched his right ear.

Ray and Winston emerged from a manhole. They were drenched in the ectoplasm. Winston was clearly irritated and asked Ray if he was trying to drown him. A homeless person with a shopping cart passed by them on the sidewalk taken aback by their appearance. Ray was equally angered about being blamed and countered he was too stupid to not to drop the plumb line. Winston took offense and warned him to watch his mouth or he was going to punch his lights on. Ray invited him to try any time. They tussled. Egon looked at his gloves. He shouted at them to stop and take their clothes off. Egon stripped off his clothing until he was only in his long underwear. Ray and Winston stopped quarreling and followed suit. They returned to their normal dispositions. Winston was shocked at what happened and confessed he was ready to kill Ray. Ray realized the ectoplasm was like pure, concentrated evil. Egon pointed out they found the endpoint of the slime flow. They realized they were in front of the Manhattan Museum of Art.

Trivia

Ghostbusters II Trivia

  • The term "Proton Pack" is spoken for the first time in the movies by Egon when he suggests they go back and get them before they continue further.
  • Ivan Reitman was the voice for the disembodied voice.[1]
  • The crew made a call all over New York for 'dead heads' and took whatever they could find. Pam Easley, visual effects coordinator, made the calls. Rick Lazzarini made a few. The better detailed heads were placed in the foreground and the lesser detailed ones in the background.[2] One head in the left foreground in close ups was sculpted by Adam Jones, who later became a guitarist for Tool.[3]
  • When Ray mentions the lines have been abandoned for fifty years, it is reference to New York's abandoned train stations. For instance, the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit system was acquired by the Board of Transportation in 1940. All the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit trolleys ran until 1948 then the streetcar track on the bridge and the underground terminal were abandoned.
  • In at least the concept phase, Egon and Ray would have entered a car full of the ghosts of subway passengers during their underground exploration.[4] There was rotting commuters.[5]
  • The Ghost Train evolved from concepts that led to the Titanic.[6]
  • The Ghost Train was added to the movie after principal photography had wrapped. The train was meant to add more tension, humor, and special effects to that part of the movie.[7][8]
  • ILM was too busy to take on additional work. Apogee - under effects supervisor Sam Nicholson - was hired to create the Ghost Train. They had 10 days to do plate photography and location work. Ernie Hudson, Harold Ramis, and Dan Aykroyd did filming with interactive lighting at The Tunnel, a New York nightclub featuring a subway motif - several hundred feet of abandoned subway track, at 220 12th Avenue in the Terminal Warehouse Company's Central Stores Building. It was located in the Lower West Side down by the docks.[9] A 10K light was placed behind the actors and three to four air cannons were placed on them to blow their hair around. When the cannons blew Hudson's helmet off, the crew blasted the actors with a bright light in place of the train.[10][11]
  • The scene of Egon, Ray, and Winston's searching underground for the Van Horne station was filmed in a practical way. The actors were turned around and proceeded on with the scene. That way, the crew didn't have to relight the scene because the tunnel looked the same in both directions.[12]
  • There was no time to build a modern-day subway so an existing antique train was chosen. John Swallow, production supervisor, found the train. It was an eight-scale version and measured 25 feet long. The train was shot on a black stage at Apogee using a snorkel lens about an eight of an inch away in clearance all the way down the train. The train was stationary and rigged with steam and reactive lights by Grant McCune. The crew rheostated the lights so they could dial them up as the camera got closer. The resulting imagery of the train was rendered transparent then composited into the live-action plate.[13][14]
  • The derailment Egon mentions is a fictional event.
  • After Winston and Egon see the River of Slime, Ray alludes to when he first saw it in Chapter 8: Down the Shaft.
  • In the November 27, 1988 draft and February 27, 1989 draft:
    • On page 89, Ray measures the river of slime. They realize the river is rising over the edge of the platform.
    • On page 90, Egon and Winston try to pull off the sounding line. Ray gets it off but Winston doesn't let go in time and he is pulled into the river.
  • For the scene where Winston, Egon, and Ray plunge into the river of slime, a partial set of the Van Horne station was used. Ernie Hudson would fall to be followed by Harold Ramis and Dan Aykroyd. Off screen, the actors would land on airbags. During optical compositing, ILM merged the live action with their miniature river. The part when the river sweeps them away required more finesse roto work and alignment. Pat Myers had to pinblock a bluescreen element of Ernie Hudson against the background and trace his movement in the river with the subtle movement of the slime taken into account. Sean Turner then animated the rippling edge around Hudson. Soft edge work and composure shifting was done to make it look like the river was enveloping the actors. Smoke was put into the plate, some articulate work was done by animation, and matte paintings of the archway were then added.[15][16]
  • In the August 5, 1988 Draft, on page 59, it is noted Peter and Lane have reservations at the Memphis.
  • In the November 27, 1988 Draft, on page 88, Peter and Dana step out of a cab at Armand's Restaurant, on the Upper West Side. Peter bribes the Maître D' for the best table.
    • On page 91, Dana tells Peter her New Year's resolution is to stop getting involved with men who aren't good for her.
    • On page 91, Peter leans in to kiss Dana but she thinks she should call Janine. Peter promises she has a special way with children.
  • The Armand's interiors were filmed at Val's on Riverside Drive.[17][18]
  • In the September 29, 1988 draft:
    • On page 75, Peter sings his New Year's resolution not to change. Lane Walker's resolution is to get a Master's degree in Fine Arts, save money to move to the country, and to stop getting involved with men who aren't good for her. Peter asks he should get out of her life in the morning and he isn't good for himself. They are about to kiss but Dana Barrett sees them.
      • In the movie, no resolutions are discussed.
    • On page 76, it turns out Dana and Lane know each other. They both went to Bennington College and Dana used to date Lane's brother.
    • On page 77, Dana's date at the restaurant is revealed to be Sting. Peter asks him what he does for work.
  • The Armand's Restaurant interiors were filmed at Val's on Riverside Drive in Los Angeles.[19][20][21]
  • The scene in Armand's with just Dana and Peter at their table was the last scene Sigourney Weaver filmed.[22] It would end up being deleted from the final cut.[23]
  • Peter's apartment scene was filmed at set on Burbank Studios in Los Angeles.
  • In the August 5, 1988 Draft, on page 60, Louis is the sole babysitter and on page 61, Louis tells the baby his variation of the Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. It is preserved in the movie.
  • In the September 29, 1988 draft, on page 74, Janine watches TV while Louis paces around with a crying Oscar and a bottle of milk. Louis tells a slightly longer version of his take on the Seven Dwarfs ending on them not filing state and federal income taxes which he admits he's not saying is right but they could've gotten into a lot of trouble. He realizes Oscar is asleep and elects to finish his story later.
  • In the November 27, 1988 and the February 27, 1989 drafts:
    • On page 91, Peter leans in to kiss Dana but she thinks she should call Janine. Peter promises she has a special way with children. They kiss. Janine watches TV while Louis paces around with a crying Oscar and a bottle of milk.
      • In the February 27, 1989 draft, Janine's surprise anyone can live in Peter's apartment is moved to page 91.
    • On page 92, Louis tells a slightly longer version of his take on the Seven Dwarfs ending on them not filing state and federal income taxes which he admits he's not saying is right but they could've gotten into a lot of trouble. He realizes Oscar is asleep and elects to finish his story later. He doesn't talk about his mom, hamster, nor suggests any video games.
      • In the February 27, 1989 draft, Janine now makes her move on Louis like in the movie.
  • Louis tells his own version of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.
  • Louis mentions a limited partnership, a business partnership made up of two or more partners. The general partner oversees and runs the business and has unlimited liability while limited partners do not partake in managing the business and have limited liability up to the amount of their investment.
  • Louis also mentions Social Security.
  • Louis mentions he has a pet hamster.
  • Louis reveals he was living with his mother until she moved to Florida.
  • Louis mentions the board game Boggle and the video game Super Mario Bros. for the 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment System.
  • In the November 27, 1988 draft:
    • On page 92, the River of Slime terminates at the end of the NYPRR into a swirling pool. Winston pulls himself out then he reaches in for Ray. They fish Egon out. Then they climb out of a manhole.
    • On page 93, Egon joins the fight asking who wants it first.
  • In the February 27, 1989 draft:
    • The end of the river is omitted and now begins with Winston, Ray, and Peter emerging from the manhole.
  • Ray, Winston, and Egon emerging from the sewer was filmed outside the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at 1 Bowling Green in New York City.
  • For the scene where Egon, Ray, and Winston emerge from the river of slime outside the Manhattan Museum of Art, it was shot in New York out on the street at 2 am in freezing weather, around 10 degrees. The actors were dumped with buckets and buckets of slime then filed for hours on end with no heaters. The actors had to emerge from a manhole where smoke was pushed up. It was a tight squeeze due to the proximity of phone conduit. None of the actors complained out loud. Ernie Hudson did at one point ask Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis what they were thinking when they wrote the scene.[24]
  • 11 takes were done of Egon, Ray, and Winston climbing from the sewers. Due to a camera motor running off speed, the scene had to filmed again. At first, the actors thought it was a joke. The scene was re-filmed the next night.[25]
  • In Chapter 19: Scaring the Straights, Ray, Winston, and Egon talk about the River of Slime and their fight.
  • In the deleted scene He Had Me by the Throat, the Ghostbusters retell the brief quarrel between Ray, Winston, and Egon in front of the Manhattan Museum of Art in Chapter 18: In the Tunnel.

Ghostbusters: Afterlife Trivia

  • The ominous scene of Trevor Spengler, Phoebe, and Podcast looking at the Shandor Mining Company's mountain after trapping Muncher and realizing there's a connection mirrors when Egon, Ray, and Winston came up from the sewers in Ghostbusters II and realize the River of Slime was flowing to the Manhattan Museum of Art.

IDW Comics Trivia

  • In Ghostbusters: Infestation #1:
    • On Page 14, the team strips off their uniforms in response to the Necrotic Slime, just like with the Mood Slime.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 1 #3:
    • On Page 11, Armand's Restaurant is referenced on a sign.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 1 #13:
    • On Page 6, Janine is wearing one of her outfits from Ghostbusters II.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 1 #16:
    • On Cover A, Winston is surrounded by the Impaled heads and the Ghost Train is approaching Winston and the heads.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 2 #6:
    • On Page 13, Roger and Egon end up in Peter's apartment during Ghostbusters II when Louis Tully and Janine Melnitz hook up.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 2 #12:
    • On Page 7, on the bottom right of Egon's board, some writing suggests Louis Tully is living in Florida.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 2 #12:
    • On Page 9, in the right side of the Times Tower, there is an ad for Armand's Restaurant and a Special New Years Midnite Showing, a nod to the Movieland Theater when the Theatre Ghost scares patrons outside.
  • In Ghostbusters Volume 2 #15:
    • On the Regular Cover, on the planner, the Post-It Note has a 15 easter egg and note to call his mom. Southfork may be reinforcing Louis' line in Ghostbusters II revealing his mom was in Florida. Southfork has a retirement community in Florida.
  • In Ghostbusters International #9:
    • On Page 4, Winston mentions his encounter with the Ghost Train in Ghostbusters II.
  • In Ghostbusters 101 Issue #4:
    • On the Subscription Cover, Janine is wearing an outfit from Ghostbusters II.

See Also

References

  1. Ivan Reitman (2019). Ghostbusters II- Commentary (2019) (Blu-ray ts. 59:51-59:52, 59:55-59:56). Sony Home Entertainment. Ivan Reitman says: "I think that might be me. I always did the deep voices."
  2. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 26. Cinefex, USA. Michael Gross says: "We bought the heads all over town. We had put out a 'dead head' call and found them wherever we could. Pam Easley--our visual effects coordinator--was a zombie wrangler for that. Rick Lazzarini made a few. We found a few. A prop house in New York had a few. For the shot, we placed the better ones in the foreground and the less-detailed ones in the background."
  3. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 177. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Rick Lazzarini says: "There's one in the left foreground in close-ups that we created and supplied. It was sculpted by Adam Jones, who ended up being the guitarist for Tool."
  4. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 4. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Line reads: "A concept illustration by artist Thom Enriquez for Ghostbusters II, in which the ghostbusters travel to a defunct subway system and encounter a car full of ghostly passengers."
  5. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 33. Cinefex, USA. Harold Ramis says: "Another featured a ghostly subway station with rotting commuters. That was the precursor to the ghost train that is now in the film."
  6. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 33. Cinefex, USA. Harold Ramis says: "The idea we were shooting for was that because of all this psychic activity beneath the city, all the dead were returning to New York. We considered several ideas. One had the Hindenberg arriving with flaming passengers getting off carrying luggage that was also on fire. Another featured a ghostly subway station with rotting commuters. That was the precursor to the ghost train that is now in the film. We also had a cemetery scene where the gravestones were taking off like rockets. Then the idea for the Titanic hit me one day and that seemed to offer the most powerful images."
  7. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 23. Cinefex, USA. Line reads: "Both scenes were among several added to the film after principle photography had officially wrapped--a situation necessitating a return to New York for additional location shooting only three months before the film was set for release."
  8. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 23 and 25. Cinefex, USA. Michael Gross says: "We went back to shoot some scenes that we thought would help clarify story points or expand certain portions of the film. More specifically, the ghost train was added because that portion of the film needed more tension, more humor and more effects. It needed to be goosed a bit. The ghost train helped heighten the jeopardy and get across the idea that an evil force was trying to keep the guys away. It also fostered the notion that all these ghostly forces were starting to build up--which, in turn, helped justify the ending more."
  9. Ivan Reitman (2019). Ghostbusters II- Commentary (2019) (Blu-ray ts. 59:30-59:34). Sony Home Entertainment. Ivan Reitman says: "I mean, this is on the sort of Lower West Side down by the docks."
  10. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 26. Cinefex, USA. Line reads: "While Available Light and Visual Concept Engineering helped out with animation effects, Apogee was drafted to create the new sequences that had been added to the film after production had wrapped--including the ghost train encounter. For Apogee, this meant going to New York for ten days of plate photography and location work at the Tunnel--a nightclub that features several hundred feet of abandoned subway track."
  11. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 26. Cinefex, USA. Sam Nicholson says: "To help sell the scene, we used interactive lighting when we filmed the actors for the plate. We put a 10k light right up behind them and then we put three or four air cannons on the to make their hair blow. There was enough wind to blow Ernie's hat off. Then we blasted them with a bright live that was supposed to be coming from the train."
  12. Joe Medjuck (2019). Ghostbusters II- Commentary (2019) (Blu-ray ts. 59:06-59:16). Sony Home Entertainment. Joe Medjuck says: "But you did something smart I didn't know about. You just turned them around, switched sides. You didn't have to relight 'cause it looks like the same in both directions."
  13. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 22 footnote. Cinefex, USA. Line reads: "Late in the production schedule, several effects scenes were added to the film – including one in which three members of the Ghostbusters team encounter a ghost train speeding through an abandoned subway tunnel. Since ILM was already swamped with work, Apogee – under effects supervisor Sam Nicholson – was engaged to engineer the illusion. Actor Ernie Hudson was photographed with interactive lighting in a New York nightclub featuring a subway motif. Later an eighth-scale train was shot on a black stage at Apogee – with motion created solely by camera movement – and the resulting imagery was rendered transparent and composited into the live-action plate."
  14. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 26. Cinefex, USA. Sam Nicholson says: "John Swallow--our production supervisor--tracked down the train, it was eighth-scale--about twenty-five feet long--and that made it nice for light because we did not have to get into fiber optic snakes or anything that small. We could use 10ks on it and hide the cables in the train. Since we did not have to sync the shot of the train to any specific mark--other than have it pass through Ernie on the plate--we did not need to film it motion control. The train was stationary, but it had steam and reactive lights that Grant McCune rigged up. We shot it on our effects stage against black--with a snorkel lens about an eight of an inch away in clearance all the way down the train. We put the camera on a dolly and had four guys just whip it down the track. Since in the scene the train lights had to intensify as the train approached the Ghostbusters, we rheostated the lights on the model so we could dial them up as the lights got closer."
  15. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 26. Cinefex, USA. Line reads: "To create the illusion of the Ghostbusters plunging into an imaginary river of slime, Hudson was first filmed falling off the station platform on the partial Van Horne set. Then Aykroyd and Ramis followed suit. Out of view of the camera, the actors landed on slime-free airbags and remained perfectly dry. Later in optical they were combined with ILM's miniature slime river."
  16. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 26. Cinefex, USA. Tom Bertin says: "The scene where Winston was being carried off down the river of slime required some incredibly difficult roto work and alignmen. It was hard to get all the pieces to jibe exactly and to make the motion convincing. With Winston, for instance, Pat Myers had to pinblock a bluescreen element of Ernie Hudson against the background and trace what would be his logical movement in terms of direction and distance. He also had to take into account subtle plays in the slime river in areas where it arched and fell away. It was quite a difficult order, but somehow he did it. He was able to work with every one of those bumps and surface undulations. He also created every bit of Winston's motions in the river--his head bobbing up and down and moving from side to side. Then Sean Turner had to animate a rippling edge around him. In the wrong hands, that could have been disastrous, but Sean did a great job--Winston fits right in there."
  17. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 151. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Line reads: "Elsewhere, Val's on Riverside Drive (identified in dialogie as Armand's) served as the site of Peter and Dana's dinner date."
  18. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 151. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Tom Duffield says: "It was two blocks from the studio. It was the closest restaurant that still had an upscale feeling to it."
  19. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 151. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Line reads: "Elsewhere, Val's on Riverside Drive (identified in dialogie as Armand's) served as the site of Peter and Dana's dinner date ."
  20. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 151. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Tom Duffield says: "It was two blocks from the studio. It was the closest restaurant that still had an upscale feeling to it."
  21. Goldstein, Patrick (June 1, 1989). "Return of the Money Making Slime" Rolling Stone #553, page 54. Wenner Media LLC, New York City, New York, USA. Line reads: "For the past eight hours, Reitman, Murray and Sigourney Weaver have been sweating under the hot lights in this Toluca Lake location, near downtown L.A., trying to polish off a key scene for the movie Ghostbusters II, the summer's most anticipated comedy sequel. Darting from table to table in a white dress shirt and black slacks, Reitman looks more like a harried waiter than one of Hollywood's highest-priced comedy filmmakers, the director of Twins, Legal Eagles, Ghostbusters, Stripes, and Meatballs and the producer of Animal House. He ducks behind his video monitor and focuses on Murray and Weaver. Even with boom mikes lurking in the background, it's a cozy moment."
  22. Goldstein, Patrick (June 1, 1989). "Return of the Money Making Slime" Rolling Stone #553, page 54. Wenner Media LLC, New York City, New York, USA. Line reads: "It's the last week of a thirteen-week shoot, and Reitman is eager to get this scene in the can. He calls for quiet. Suddenly Murray stands and waves his napkin in the air. "Correct me if I'm wrong," he says, "but isn't this double Academy Award nominee Sigourney Weaver's last shot of the movie?" The crew cackles with glee. Throughout the day, whenever work has been halted by technical delays, Murray has lectured the crew about "keeping our double nominee waiting," a reference to Weaver's being up for Oscars for both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress (for Gorillas in the Mist and Working Girl; she would win neither)."
  23. Goldstein, Patrick (June 1, 1989). "Return of the Money Making Slime" Rolling Stone #553, page 54. Wenner Media LLC, New York City, New York, USA. Line reads: "Finally, Reitman calls for action. The scene is Dr. Venkman's last chance at romance. As the camera rolls, the doctor coos, "So ... making any New Year's resolutions?" His love object tosses back her hair and coolly replies, "I want to stop getting involved with men who aren't any good for me." Venkman is crushed. "Does that start exactly at midnight tomorrow?" he asks. "Or could you maybe hold off for a few days?" Reitman beams. "It's a take." The crew cheers. Weaver stands up, merrily spins around and takes a bow. Murray is delighted too."
  24. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 28. Cinefex, USA. Ernie Hudson says: "We shot that scene in New York out on the street at two in the morning. I don't know how cold it was, but it couldn't have been more than ten degrees--and with the wind whipping around, we were all freezing. And we were drenched. They poured buckets and buckets of sticky, watery slime over us--over our heads, over everywhere because Ivan wanted it even in our eyes. He wanted us to look like we had been swimming in slime. Then we had to pull off our jumpsuits--which weren't really warm enough for a New York winter to begin with--and stand there in our underwear. I don't think I've ever been so cold in my life. We shot for hours and we couldn't go into the trailers because they were too far away. So we had to sit outside between takes without the luxury of heaters. Danny was there and Harold was there and they weren't complaining, so I figured I shouldn't either. But things did get a little nuts, and at one point I had to ask them: "Wait a minute. You guys wrote this scene? What the hell were you doing? Didn't you think you were going to have to do this stuff?""
  25. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 28. Cinefex, USA. Harold Ramis says: "When we wrote the scene I thought they would find a manhole and then we would go down a ladder and come up. Well, in front of the customs house that doubled for our museum, there was only a closed box underground for a phone conduit, and it was filled with big phone connectors. We had to wedge ourselves in like contortionists. Before we got into the hole, the effects guys would cover us with slime. Then they would smoke up the hole and put the manhole cover on it. I kept saying it was as close to being trapped in a mine or cave-in or the American earthquake as you could imagine. It was pretty awful and it was just freezing. But that really was not the worst of it. We did eleven takes, and then the next morning Ivan came to us and said the camera motor had run off speed and we had to do the scene again. At first we thought he was kidding. I mean, doing it once was the worst experience of my life. We thought, 'Great joke.' Unfortunately, it was no joke and the next night we did the whole thing all over again."

Gallery

Primary Canon

Discarded Material

Behind the Scenes

Storyboards of Final Version

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