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The Mink Coat is a haunted luxurious, full-length, white mink fur coat.

History[]

Primary Canon[]

During New Year's Eve, 1989, New York City was being invaded by ghosts and inundated with Psychomagnotheric Slime. The slime oozed up from below the city and formed puddles on the sidewalk. A rich woman wearing a large mink fur coat accidentally stepped into a puddle of the pink slime. As a result, the dead minks in her coat came back to life and tried to attack the unfortunate lady. The woman screamed in terror and, after a few moments of trying to dodge the snapping minks, managed to take the coat off. She dropped it to the ground and the coat scampered down the sidewalk, screaming and hissing at bystanders.

Behind the Scenes[]

The Mink Coat was filmed at night on the sidewalk in Los Angeles outside the Biltmore Hotel. Tim Lawrence and his crew developed four different coats that were actuated by radio-controlled servos, hand puppeteering and cable-pull mechanisms. A white fur was envisioned and was the basis for the coat, heads, and legs. After everything was scuplted and cast in foam latex, mechanics finished, actor fitted, and harness was finished, a film test was sent to Ivan Reitman 10 days before the shoot. Reitman was fine with the test but asked why the coat was white. The crew scrambled and redid the coat with darker fur in time for the shoot.[1][2][3] The master coat was the version where all the heads could react. Close-up heads were shot as inserts.[4][5] The master coat was the version where all the heads could react. Close-up heads were shot as inserts.[6]

Trivia[]

Appearances[]

Primary Canon[]

Secondary Canon[]


References[]

  1. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 30. Cinefex, USA. Line reads: "Filmed at night on a street location in Los Angeles, the illusion was accomplished using four different coats actuated variously by radio-controlled servos, hand puppeteering and cable-pull mechanisms. Tim Lawrence and his creature crew developed the specialty garments."
  2. Eisenberg, Adam (November 1989). Ghostbusters Revisited, Cinefex magazine #40, page 30. Cinefex, USA. Tim Lawrence says: "When this gag first surfaced, many concepts were discussed and drawn. Some included using live animals--but for obvious reasons, those were discarded early on. What was finally chosen was the approach seen in the film--with one exception. From the very beginning we conceived of the coat as being made from a nonspecific white fur. All of the prototyping and patterns had been generated with a white coat in mind and synthetic fur had been ordered in bulk. The heads and legs--which were sculpted and cast in foam latex--had been hand-laid in a white crepe fur and all that remained was to finish the mechanics, fit the actress with the support harness and complete the assembly. About ten days before we were due to shoot, we sent a film test down to Ivan showing how the coat might photograph in either daytime or nighttime lighting and a test of the 'runway' gag. He thought the look and the gag were fine--but he wanted to know why the coat was white. Michael was as surprised as we were. It had never occurred to us that it might be anything else. Fortunately, we were able to scramble around and redo the coat with darker fur in time for the shoot."
  3. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 151. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Line reads: "Four different coats, all outfitted with a variety of practical effects, were used in a late-night location shoot on an LA street outside the Biltmore Hotel, which doubled as the Sedgewick Hotel in the original film."
  4. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 168-169. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Ned Gorman says: "There was a master coat that the lady was wearing, which had all the heads react and do stuff. And there were close-up heads which were shot as inserts, where they were being [manipulated] from behind."
  5. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 151. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Line reads: "Four different coats, all outfitted with a variety of practical effects, were used in a late-night location shoot on an LA street outside the Biltmore Hotel, which doubled as the Sedgewick Hotel in the original film."
  6. Wallace, Daniel (2015). Ghostbusters The Ultimate Visual History, p. 168-169. Insight Editions, San Rafael CA USA, ISBN 9781608875108. Ned Gorman says: "There was a master coat that the lady was wearing, which had all the heads react and do stuff. And there were close-up heads which were shot as inserts, where they were being [manipulated] from behind."
  7. Aykroyd, Dan & Ramis, Harold (1983). Ghostbusters (First Draft August 5, 1983) (Script p. 102). Paragraph reads : "She starts down the runway in a very exotic furcoat. She reaches the end of the runway and pirouettes for the customers. Suddenly a yapping mink head pops out of the shoulder of the coat, then another and another until the whole coat is a mess of writhing, yapping rodents. The model screams and throws the coat off.""
  8. Aykroyd, Dan & Ramis, Harold (1989). Ghostbusters II (February 27, 1989 Draft) (Script p. 98). Line reads: "She yelps in pain...The doorman looks curiously at her, then recoils in shock as her coat comes alive. MINK HEADS pop out of the thick fur, SNARLING, BARKING and YAPPING, their sharp, little teeth biting the air. Reacting quickly, the doorman yanks the coat off the woman's back, throws it to the ground and starts stomping on it as the Woman and her husband look in horror. The coat scuttles down the steps and runs off down the street."


Gallery[]

Primary Canon[]

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Behind the Scenes[]

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