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Symmetrical Stacking is a unique form of psychokinetic activity that involves the precise vertical stacking of books.

History

Primary Canon

While investigating a sighting of the Library ghost in the New York City Public Library, Peter Venkman, Ray Stantz, and Egon Spengler observed symmetrical stacking. Peter was skeptical it was paranormal in nature. Ray cited the Philadelphia Mass Turbulence of 1947 event while Egon took readings with the P.K.E. Meter.

Secondary Canon

Ghostbusters: The Video Game Stylized Versions

According to Tobin's Spirit Guide

  • Category: None
  • Abilities: None

Tobin's Summary

In certain ares of high psychokinetic activity I've seen peculiar things happen to small objects, especially flat ones. In addition to the almost commonplace levitation and hurling about objects will occasionally end up in perfectly symmetrical stacks, ranging anywhere from a few to dozens of feet in height. I've measured several of these stacks over the course of my studies and they all exhibit perfect mathematical symmetry beyond the capabilities of normal human beings.

Egon's Notes:

I've had the privilege of seeing a few of these stacks firsthand. It's fascinating how rapidly these stacks can be assembled, almost falling haphazardly into place but still retaining their amazing symmetry. Had Tobin been around for a few more decades, he would have seen the Philadelphia Mass Turbulence of 1947, one of the most impressive instances of this phenomenon to date.

Ray's Tips:

Don't do what Venkman did and try to play Jenga with them, OK?

Supplemental Data

The art page can be found in the NYC Public Library, during the "Get Her!" section. It is hidden in a microfiche reader in the room just before the sorting room; lots of stacked books are nearby.

Dimension 50-S

In Dimension 50-S, Symmetrical Stacking was observed upon entering the Mrs. Roger's House construct. Samuel Hazer remembered the story Ray told the junior team.

Trivia

  • The stack of books was Ivan Reitman's idea while he was on his way to the morning shoot of Ghostbusters. He felt it was a strong set up for the ghost sequence.[1]

Appearances

Primary Canon

Secondary Canon

References

  1. Shay, Don (November 1985). Making Ghostbusters, p. 28 annotation. New York Zoetrope, New York NY USA, ISBN 0918432685. Paragraph reads: "To sustain the suspense -- and at the same time reinforce the comedy -- Ivan Reitman felt that the first real ghost sequence demanded a stronger setup than what appeared in the script. So, on his way to the set on the morning of shooting, he came up with the idea of having his scientists discover a single stack of books piled from floor to ceiling."

Gallery

Primary Canon

Secondary Canon

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